Should You Keep Your Oakland County Home On The Market?

Should You Keep Your Oakland County Home On The Market?

Should You Keep Your Oakland County Home On The Market?

Many a home sellers in Oakland County has been there—the house has been on the market for months and there is no sign of a sale or even an offer.  At what point should you pull your Oakland County house off of the market, assuming it is Should You Keep Your Oakland County Home On The Market?even an option for you?  When you start to feel like you are getting nowhere, it’s important to step back and consider the facts of the situation before you make any decisions.

Is The Season A Factor?

If your Oakland County house has been on the market through the summer and well into fall, and the holiday season is approaching, you may feel there is no point in keeping it listed through the winter.  You may be right.  The holiday season in Oakland County MI is a notoriously difficult time to sell, and you yourself may want to just take a break and enjoy your holidays without interruptions from agents and potential buyers.  If you can take a step back and resume your efforts to sell in the late winter or early spring, doing so is usually a wise choice, but not always the best choice. Keep in mind the current housing market conditions in Oakland County MI and throughout Michigan home buyers are having a hard time finding a home to buy right now, the supply of houses for sale in Oakland County MI markets and across the state are hitting near all-time lows.Interest rates remain low, but there are not enough homes available to meet the demand.

Are You Asking Too Much?

Before you consider pulling your Oakland County house off the market, take an honest look at your asking price.  If it is unrealistic and you have been holding off from dropping it, going to a lower asking price before you give up on selling altogether might be the wiser course of action.  Giving up on what you feel your house is worth is difficult, but if selling is an urgent need you are going to have to do what is necessary. Overpricing your Oakland County home gives the advantage to your competition — the other homes on the market. The buyers you want to attract won’t see your home because they are only looking at homes listed in their price range. Prospective Oakland County buyers who do see your home realize they can get a better deal elsewhere. If it’s your home they want, they may choose to wait until you lower the price. And if you do reduce the price, other potential buyers wonder why the home has been on the market so long.

The right price is determined by the size, condition and location of your home, what comparable homes are selling for at the time you list yours, and the balance of supply and demand in your area.

 The Market Is Just Slow

Economic factors have slowed the sale of homes all across the country, but in Oakland County MI there is not enough inventory for home buyers to choose from. If the market is particularly slow where you live, you might want to consider taking the house off of the market for a while and waiting it out to get a better price later, but all indications point to a thriving housing market with the Oakland County Mi area.  If you have already moved out, consider renting the house for a while until the market looks up, but this can also be a headache for you. The old trick of pulling a home off the market and then putting it on sometime later in order to make it appear as a new listing doesn’t work any more. Since introducing CDOM (Cumulative Days On Market) buyers and their gents can see how long a property has been on the market, even when it’s been on and off. The history of the property is available to us within the MLS and agents go into that when advising their buyer-clients.You have heard the three most important aspects of real estate are: Location, Location Location…Well the three most important aspects when trying to sell a Oakland County home are: price, price, price…

Making the decision to pull your home off the market is difficult, and you should never do it without looking at all the details and discussing it with your REALTOR®.  In some cases, however, it will be the wisest course of action and result in a sale for more money down the line, but keep in ind the good market we have now in Oakland County MI may be a completely different scenario if you wait .

Here Are 8 Secrets To Making A Difficult Home Sale Look Easy

Not all home sellers need to go the extra mile to sell at a good price. But where help is needed, there are several things we can consider together to make a tough sale happen. For example:

  1. To obtain your best price, don’t be in a hurry to sell. Allow time for the right buyer to come along.
  2. Decide early what your lowest price will be. On the other hand, don’t hold out for the impossible.
  3. Think of pricing in terms of un-rounded numbers ($99,800, for example instead of $100,000).
  4. Always be ready to show your home at short notice.
  5. Be willing to redecorate if necessary, and mention that in your listing.
  6. Reply at once to an offer.
  7. Avoid asking for contingencies on an offer.
  8. Make immediate possession possible.

Not all of these suggestions may be feasible, of course, in your situation. That’s why we suggest that you let us inspect your property and help you decide what might be most suitable for your particular needs.

 

 

Search All Homes For Sale
Homes Close to Where You Work
Avoid Foreclosure
What is Your Home Worth?
Agent Image
Tom Gilliam
ReMax Classic
248-790-5594
[email protected]
Facebook Text Facebook Icon
Twitter Text Twitter Icon
LinkedIn Text LinkedIn Icon
YouTube Text YouTube Icon
Google Plus Text Google Plus Icon
Banner
Greater Oakland County Peanut Butter Pumpkin Spiders

Greater Oakland County Peanut Butter Pumpkin Spiders

Greater Oakland County Peanut Butter Pumpkin Spiders

Greater Oakland County Peanut Butter Pumpkin Spiders* Create terrifying tombstones. Set the stage before trick-or-treaters even hit the front door. Use wood, cardboard or thick Styrofoam to create tombstones that you can put in your front yard. After cutting out the desired shape, use a matte gray spray paint to cover the surface, and then use black paint to write creative epitaphs such as “Dare to Disturb” or “Happy Haunting.”

* Get creative with pumpkins. Everyone enjoys a good jack-o-lantern, but why not choose to think outside the box when decorating with pumpkins this year? Instead of carving, try spray painting or using your favorite Halloween candy to decorate pumpkins in fun, spooky patterns. Plus, this is a project that even the littlest witch can enjoy.

* Download a haunted playlist. Nothing is quite as spooky as the sound of doors creaking or ghosts shrieking. Put together a haunted playlist that you can listen to while guests arrive, or stick speakers near an open window to entice the nearby trick-or-treaters to stop by for some candy.

* Serve spine-chilling treats. Use your free time on Halloween to make these simple but yummy treats designed to look like spiders. Serve them when guests arrive to kick-off the scary festivities.

Reese’s(R) Peanut Butter Pumpkin Spiders

(6 Servings)

Ingredients:

6 Reese’s (R) Peanut Butter Pumpkins

1/4 cup Hershey’s (R) Milk Chocolate Chips

Large pretzel twists (2 -1/2 to 3 inches)

12 yellow Reese’s Pieces (R) Candies

Directions:

Line tray or cookie sheet with wax paper. Remove wrappers from peanut butter pumpkins and place alongside each other on tray leaving 1 inch of space between each peanut butter pumpkin. For each spider, cut 8 matching curved sections from pretzels which will form the legs. Set aside remaining pretzels pieces.

Place milk chocolate chips in small microwave-safe bowl. Microwave at medium 30 seconds; stir. If necessary, microwave at medium an additional 10 seconds at a time, stirring after each heating, until chips are melted and smooth when stirred. Transfer to small heavy duty plastic food storage bag. Cut off one corner of bag about 1/4 inch from the tip.

Attach pretzel legs and yellow candy “eyes” to spider with melted chocolate; place dot of melted chocolate on each eye. Allow chocolate to set before moving spiders.

Greater Oakland County Home Energy Check 2014

Greater Oakland County Home Energy Check 2014

It’s that time of year again in Greater Oakland County Michigan when winter approaches, so there’s no better time then now to give your home an energy check up. Energy costs have shot up, and you may be paying a lot more than necessary to be comfortable in your home throughout the year. Most homeowners in Greater Oakland County have a number of easy, inexpensive options for reducing energy consumption and energy bills. The older your home, the more likely it is you canGreater Oakland County Home Energy Check 2014 dramatically cut your utility costs, improve your comfort level and be environmentally responsible in the bargain. As we can clearly remember Winter 2013 in the Greater Oakland County area was the toughest in years and it really took a toll on may homeowners and their tight budgets.

Here’s where to look for opportunities to save as much as $500 a year on energy expenses:

Heating And Cooling Systems

  • How old are your systems? If brand-new, you’re likely to have super high-efficiency units. If less than five years old, they’re likely to be high efficiency and certainly worth keeping. Older systems may or may not be costing you more money than necessary. If yours are 20 years old or more, replacing them could keep you more comfortable and cut your utility costs by a third or better. You may want to look at solar heating (free energy!) as part of a heating system upgrade. Though the initial investment in any new system may seem steep, consider that dramatically lower bills will recoup your cost in just a few years. After that, it’s pure savings.
  • Make sure your heating and cooling systems get a tune-up every year. For under $100, a professional cleaning and maintenance check annually should more than pay for itself.Do you change your systems’ air filter monthly? Doing so costs little, but improves system efficiency, thereby saving money.
  • Do you have an electronic thermostat? If not, install one and program it to use less energy (higher temperature in summer, lower in winter) while you’re away from home during the day, and at night while you sleep.
  • Before going on vacation or a business trip, turn the thermostat down to 55°F in winter, or up to 80°F in summer. That’s comfortable enough to keep indoor plants alive, and to keep pipes from freezing during cold weather.

Hot Water

  • How old is your water heater? Is it a high-efficiency unit? If your heater has given you 10 or more years of service, you would probably save money by replacing it.
  • What temperature is your water heater set to maintain? Most factory settings are at 140°F, usually higher than necessary for a ready supply of hot water. Experiment with turning the temperature down and see if you even notice a difference. Start with 130°. If you find that adequate, drop it to 120°.
  • Don’t forget to turn the water heater way down (preferably off) when you’re away from your home on business trips or vacation. Why pay for hot water nobody is going to use?
  • Does your water heater have an insulating blanket? Are exposed hot water pipes wrapped in insulation? Keep them wrapped and you’ll spend less.
  • Have you installed low-flow shower heads? Again, the cost of the fixtures will be repaid with annual savings, not only in reduced energy to heat the water, but also in lower water bills.

Air In/Air Out

  • Do your outside walls and attic have insulation in them? To check the walls, remove a cover plate from an electrical outlet on an outside wall. If you can’t find any insulation, make the investment to minimize the amount of expensive “conditioned” air that escapes your home. Also consider adding attic insulation if you have 3″ or less. Go up to 12″.
  • Do some of your air ducts run through your attic or basement? Make sure they’re wrapped in insulation.
  • Does your home have more than one return register per floor? It probably should. No matter how many you have, make sure they are not blocked by furniture or curtains.
  • Do you use your old fireplace? Though charming, fireplaces are certainly not energy efficient in today’s homes. Consider replacing it with an airtight woodstove or fireplace insert that sends heat back into your home.
  • If you must use your old fireplace, make sure it has a flue that closes tightly and keep it closed when you are not using the fireplace.
  • Does your home have new, energy-efficient windows, doors and storm doors? If not, consider investing in replacements with low-E or thermal-paned glass.
  • Do windows and doors have properly installed weather-stripping and caulking in good repair? If not, it’s an inexpensive fix that takes a little bit of time but pays high rewards in savings.

Appliances

  • Is your refrigerator less than 2 years old and energy-efficient model? Consider replacing refrigerators over 10 years old. At the very least, replace gaskets if they no longer fit tightly.
  • Does your dishwasher have an energy-saving feature? Be sure to use it!

Lighting

  • Consider replacing often-used incandescent light fixtures with fluorescent fixtures.
  • Replace incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs.
  • Use lower-wattage bulbs throughout the house.
  • Replace outdoor security lights that stay on all night with motion-sensitive fixtures.
Northville Homes-Hot Market Tips

Northville Homes-Hot Market Tips

Northville, MI Homes are selling as fast as they come on the market these days, so you Northville home buyers may want to choose one or more of the following ways to beat the competition to the front door:

Bid realistically (near listing price) instead of hoping your Northville seller will cave in to a low offer.

Make your offer without strings (sale of previous home, home inspection, etc.) but only if you’re certain your old Northville home will sell quickly or the property is in move-in condition.                                                Northville Homes-Hot Market Tips

Be flexible (within reason) to the Northville seller’s conditions concerning conveyable property, dates of closing and occupancy. Giving in a little may gain you a lot.

Buying In Northville Michigan at the Price You Want

Found the house of your dreams in Northville MI? Now the negotiations begin.

As your Northville, MI Realtor I can guide you through the process of making a purchase offer that works. You’ll want to start by learning as much as you can about how much the property is worth,

I have up-to-the-minute price data for Northville MI at hand to help you analyze any comparable properties. Although every home is unique in Northville, here’s some of what makes a home “comparable” to the one you’re considering purchasing:

  • Same Northville Neighborhood
  • Same Age and Condition
  • Same Size Lot
  • Same Home Style–equivalent living space, number of rooms and baths.
  • Similar terms of sale.

Follow sales price trends In Northville

Ask about recent pricing trends in the neighborhoods. Specifically Northville, what has been the average difference between listing price and sales price for recent sales of comparable homes in Northville? What is the ratio of Northville’s assessed tax value to market value?

Offer what you think the Northville home is worth

Some asking prices have built-in padding, but others are already priced to sell in Northville. You could lose a well-priced home with a low-ball bid. Remember, a lower mortgage interest rate will allow you to borrow more and pay a higher price for a home without increasing your monthly payment.

Spell Out the Details

Consider getting a pre-purchase home appraisal and home inspection. The appraisal will give an independent valuation of the Northville home, and the inspection will help identify any potential problems you may have overlooked. Consider including a contingency making the contract subject to a satisfactory appraisal and inspection of the Northville home. (most of the time this is in contracts).

Evaluate Contingencies

The contract can also be contingent upon an attorney’s review, previous home sale, and acceptable mortgage loan terms, etc. Contingencies are typically used to smooth acceptance of an offer without delaying the final decision. Too many contingencies, however, weaken your bargaining position in pursuing your Northville home purchase.

Know What’s Important to You

Prioritize the elements of the sale on paper (“must” and “want”) and decide where you have negotiating room with the Northville home seller–what you’ll give up or accept in exchange for a concession. Items frequently negotiated include adjustments for needed or requested repairs, what personal property stays and what goes with the seller, points and closing costs, and move-in date. Knowing exactly what you want and where you are willing to bargain is your most important negotiating tool when it comes to your Northville home purchase.

Put Everything in the First Purchase Offer

If the first offer is accepted by the Northville home seller it may be too late to add anything. Include a financial statement. Do all negotiating in writing with a deadline for a response, often 48 hours. You are free to cancel an offer until it is accepted by the seller. Require that your binder or deposit be held in an escrow account. In this Hot Northville Market it is important to do everything in the first purchase offer, as it could be gone.

Northville Home Buyer Be Patient

Negotiating for the perfect home in Northville MI could take several days. Be patient; you won’t want to rush into one of the most important purchases you’ll ever make.

About Northville MI:

Northville has quiet streets, quaint shops and works hard to maintain it’s small town charms. Housing in Northville is a mix of single family residences, historic homes, multi-family accommodations and more. Homes for sale range from starter homes up through luxury and historic homes. There are also real estate options such as apartments, duplexes and more. Lastly, there are condominiums, and town houses which provide a variety of amenities to insure comfort and convenience for residents. Local agents are ready, willing and able to help you find the home of your dreams in beautiful, historic Northville.

Greater Oakland County Moving With Children

Greater Oakland County Moving With Children

Greater Oakland County Moving With Children

Relocating with children in the Greater Oakland County area or any other for that matter can be a stressful situation, not only for you but the children of Greater Oakland County as well. It is important to involve your children in your home Greater Oakland County Moving With Childrensearch and your relocation plans. When making your list of things to do before, during and after your move, don’t forget to include your pets as they are as much of the family as well. Moving can be stressful, even dangerous, for pets if their interests are not taken into consideration as well.

Child experts agree it’s a good idea to involve the children when family makes relocation plans to move. You may have mixed feelings about taking the kids house-hunting in Oakland County, however. (It’s hard enough for just two people to decide on a new home!) Here are a few pointers that may help in your relocation move and including children in the process.

Narrow the Field First

The kids don’t need to visit every potential house on the list in Oakland County. If possible, wait until you’ve selected two or three serious prospects of homes before bringing the children along. In any case, limit your kid-accompanied tours to three houses or less per day

Provide Behavioral Guidelines

Remind the kids to treat the home owners and their property with respect. Make sure the kids stay in the same room with you at all times and they “keep their hands to themselves.” If the home owners are present, your family members should also keep their thoughts about the house to themselves until after you leave the property. Making positive comments in the presence of the home owners could work against you when negotiating the price, while negative comments could spark a hostile reaction, causing the home owner to sell to another home buyer.

Make the Kids Your Secretaries

If they’re old enough, your children can each keep a log of the homes you look at I Greater Oakland County, including detailed information about the house — location, size, types and numbers of rooms, etc. Have them describe their feelings about the house, too, particularly what they think it, and what would be like to live there for them.

Locate the Nearest Playground

A post-tour trip to the park (or local mall, if you have teenagers) can be a great motivator for good behavior during tours of Oakland County properties and a nice way to get to know the area as well. Walking the streets in the Oakland County neighborhoods will also give you and the kids a better feeling for the local lifestyle and whether there are other children the same age as yours in the area. Also look for local parks and recreation for children to visit and become a part of.

Offer Entertainment

Bring along books or games to help your kids through the “I’m bored” stage. If you’ll be driving for extended periods, bring some audio books or favorite music. Nowadays usually it is a I-Pad or tablet that keeps them busy, but make sure they pay attention to the particular homes of interest that you have and get their opinions as you go through each.

Time Your Tours for Success

Plan to look at homes in Greater Oakland County early in the day or just after (certainly not during) nap time. Be prepared with snack foods and drinks to keep energy levels up.

Let Them Know Their Input Counts

Although the final decision is yours, your children will feel better about the move to Greater Oakland County if they know you value what they think about their potential new home and neighborhood.

How to Help Your Kids Adjust To the Move to Greater Oakland County

  • Children can find a move to Greater Oakland County overwhelming, even to a home within the same area. Here’s how you can help:
  • Parents’ positive attitudes about a new environment inspire positive attitudes in children. Try to focus the children on what they can gain, rather than on what is being lost.
  • Keep schedules as normal as possible to give children the extra security needed in the new surroundings.
  • Call on new neighbors in Oakland County early so your children can meet other children who live nearby.
  • Seek counseling or academic tutoring immediately if a child runs into trouble in the new Oakland County School, being sure to give the child lots of encouragement and praise in the process.
  • Be available at mealtime, bedtime and (if possible) after school to listen to and share new experiences.
  • Sign up your child for one or two activities, sports or lessons so he or she can meet new friends and establish or continue special interests.
  • Consider requests for clothing, bikes and other equipment that may not have been a “necessity” in the previous area but can help a child fit in with new peers.
  • Visit the old home and invite old friends to your new home in Oakland Country to help your child maintain a sense of roots.
  • Exercise patience during the adjustment period. Finding a new sense of “home” takes time.
1 2 3 7

Pin It on Pinterest