10  Home Decor Trends To Retire In 2019

10 Home Decor Trends To Retire In 2019

As the new year is here, plenty of homeowners look for ways to refresh their spaces to keep them feeling interesting and updated. If you’re preparing to put a home on the market, keeping up with trends is key because unless your prospective buyers are flippers, stagers, or redecorating fiends, nothing can make would-be buyers turn tail faster than some outdated decor.

Check out these once-popular home decor trends that are being shown the door, and find out what’s replacing them in the months ahead.

1. Rose gold Decor loses its luster

Sorry, rose gold. You were lovely, but it’s over. This mauve metallic is out, and straight-up gold and brushed gold are back.

2. Goodbye, granite counters

Granite had a great run in the 1990s and 2000s, but this kitchen staple is being replaced by quartz, which is considered virtually indestructible. So, go ahead, set those hot plates down and don’t worry about a thing. Since granite is porous, it has the potential to trap bacteria if not cared for correctly. Removing that concern is a welcome relief in arguably the busiest room in the house.

3. Sunsetting nautical motifs

You’d think something as classic as navy and white could never go out of style, but when it comes to nautical-themed decor, that ship is sinking. Fast. Even when designing a beach house, experts are putting those sailboats, shells, and starfish out to sea and letting a mix of bold blues blend for a less-is-more aesthetic.

4. Bye-bye, Edison bulbs

Edison bulbs were a bright light on the decor scene from 2015 on, but their popularity is definitely dimming. Is it any wonder? It’s only so long you can stand to look at an exposed bulb. (Sorry, Edison.) Also, the trend was most often incorporated in industrial motifs, which are also on the way out, by the way.

5. See ya later, statement range hoods

Though some boast beautiful detail, many statement range hoods were swallowing up the room. Skinny hoods are on trend and slimming down the look of stovetops.

6. So long, all-white kitchens

All-white kitchens were all the rage. If there’s a room in the home that should appear as clean as can be, it’s definitely the kitchen. But as people spend more and more time in this space, often dubbed “the heart of the home,” they’re longing for a look that’s warmer and more reflective of their personalities. Prepare to see bright, bold kitchens, complete with colorful appliances, to be in vogue for the next few years.

7. Questioning the wisdom of word art

Designers suggest homeowners look beyond their walls for inspiration and motivation. If you want your walls to make a statement, decorators suggest the use of wallpaper or hand-painted murals.

8. Barn doors, you’re back out in the cold

There’s no debating it, barn doors had a moment. Adding them to bathrooms or closets brought the rustic charm of the country indoors, no matter your locale. But, as farmhouse-chic style wanes, barn doors are being put out to pasture in today’s decor.

9. Chevron prints are no longer on point

Chevron prints were all the rage for a while there, appearing on everything from clothing to wallpaper. But this pattern has been overdone. Replacing it are geometric shapes and tropical prints in decor.

10. Shiplap gets docked

Wood on the walls peaked for a few years. It’s time to pack up that paneling and move on. As farmhouse decor loses its appeal, it’s no surprise this trend is starting to feel outdated.

If you’re hoping to make a home feel as current as possible, considering removing these decor duds and replacing them with on-trend alternatives.

Northville House Design Idea Summed Up

Northville House Design Idea Summed Up

There’s news in the world of house design—for a change! Those who keep in touch with the house design innovations that Northville buyers are currently favoring know one thing is for certain: they don’t change overnight. True innovations are rare.

Fads occasionally come and go (remember “industrial décor” and barn door sliders?)—but by definition, fads don’t wind up making much of a dent in how most Northville homes are house designbuilt or remodeled. That’s a good thing: overexuberant style-chasing can be expensive to correct once a clever style has come and gone.

I bring this up because it looks as if there are a couple of interconnected house design ideas that look like they might be durable—and if so, Northville home buyers and sellers will want to be aware of them.

Northville House Design Change is Really a Marketing Insight

First is a house design feature that’s gradually been working its way up in popularity: the ground floor master bedroom. Last week, The Wall Street Journal ran an article that pointed to the demographics that make this a house design winner. They call it “main-floor master bedroom”—but whatever you call it, the logic is irrefutable. As the number of America’s seniors grows, the practicality of easy access grows with it, gradually shifting from convenience to necessity.

The associated and more consequential design news is summed up in one word: flex. A flex room or area is one that has no designated purpose, but which can be configured and later re-configured to accommodate changing needs and lifestyles. Flex rooms are usually sited off the entry hall, near the main living space, generally close to a bathroom (“so they can easily morph into bedrooms”). They have ample electric wiring so they can become home offices or media centers. Or anything else, not yet anticipated.

Flex rooms used to be called “bonus rooms”—but that might be selling the innovative element short. To me, the term “bonus room” has always seemed like a luxury afterthought; a non-necessity. “Flex room” sounds active and dynamic—and valuable. In fact, the essence of the idea may be more of a marketing insight than design innovation. Whichever it is, it’s something Northville sellers can appreciate for its practicality: potential buyers will tend to project their own needs into the space. As a house planner put it to the Journal, “When you name it ‘dining room,’ buyers will never get that out of their mind.”

In a wider sense, the “flex” idea is a reflection of 21st-century reality. At this point, we all understand that change is the most predictable element of our future. Having built-in flexibility in a home’s design is one way to assure that it stays in style—and also a way to ensure its lasting resale value.

Maximizing that is my specialty—so be sure to keep my number handy!

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