Whats Your Home Worth

The Offer on Your Home

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The Offer on Your Home…

It is an exciting moment when an offer to purchase your home comes in can also feel a little overwhelming. One common first impulse is to ask “How much are they offering?” While price is an important factor, it’s also important to sit back and look at the big picture when negotiating a sale… Consider the following 

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Buyer’s Financial Situation

Is the buyer qualified?
What is the buyer’s annual income and employment history?
How much down payment and closing-cost cash is available and what is its source?
What type of financial debt is there? Car loans? Credit cards?

Financing Method

Are the loan type and interest rate specifications realistic for current economic conditions?
Is the length of time requested to obtain a loan realistic? Forty-five days is often considered a typical time frame. It allows enough time to process papers, but also allows you to put the home back on the market promptly if things fall through.

Your Costs

How much does the buyer want you to contribute toward closing costs?
What will your net proceeds be? Add up any points, taxes or fix-up expenses requested and deduct them from the contract price to determine if your final profit is what you need to make your move.

Your Calendar

Does the buyer’s proposed settlement date give you enough time to select your next home and obtain financing?

If you can’t move to your next home promptly at settlement, can you rent back from the buyer to stay in your home a while longer?

Contingencies

Must the buyer sell a home before buying yours? You may not have the time to wait while they sell.
What add-ons does the buyer want? Curtains, lawn equipment, swing sets? All of this can affect your final net proceeds, or be used as bargaining chips, or both.

Proven Tips To Turn An Offer Into A Solid Contract Fast

When the bid is presented to you, listen to the offer, even take notes — but don’t respond until the presentation is complete. You have three choices: (1) accept the contract as presented; (2) reject the contract; or (3) make a counteroffer. Most often, sellers choose the third alternative. The choice is yours, but we can advise you every step of the way.

If you find some items in the proposal unacceptable, it’s time to negotiate. It’s also time to call on our experience and training. This is when our professionalism really pays off. We will guide you through the contract maze of small print, explain what each item entails, and help you evaluate the bottom-line impact of price and terms in the bid, as well as suggest possible responses.

Don’t delay.
Often, time is of the essence. Avoid delays. Although you may want more time to think over the offer, be aware the buyer could withdraw the offer any time before you sign it. The best time to decide what terms and price and timetable you will (or will not) accept is while preparing your house for sale, so you can respond quickly when a contract is presented.

Consider seller-paid points.
It’s good to know before you begin negotiating that paying points for your buyer’s loan is a powerful double sweetener. That’s because seller-paid points save the buyer out-of-pocket cash, AND serve as a tax deduction for the buyer. As we work together, we will clue you into other important negotiating tools.

Do it in writing.
Make your counteroffer in writing on the original contract form, initialing changes you propose. Contract negotiations may go back and forth several times, with each party giving and getting something each time as you zero in on common ground. Don’t negotiate by phone and, even if it looks messy, don’t retype the contract as long as it’s legible. Something could get left out or inadvertently changed.

 

Consider a contingency kick out.
If the buyer offers a contingent contract, you could consider including a kick-out clause. The clause allows you to accept another offer after a stated time, such as 45 or 60 days, or requires the contingency be removed within 48 to 72 hours. Occasionally, sellers require a higher sale price when accepting a contract contingent upon the buyer selling their present home. Often, a home-inspection contingency is added by the buyer, so having an inspection before you list your home can prevent costly repair surprises after the contract is negotiated.

Rely on your agent.
I can recheck comparable sales, compare offers if you receive more than one bid, and compute how much you will net from the sale. I can also help you focus on the buyer’s creditworthiness and whether the buyer can afford to buy your house.

You can also do a little Homework yourself by getting a ball-park estimate on your home and see what other similar properties to your in your neighborhood have sold for or are currently on the market. If you would like a free NO OBLIGATION HOME VALUE REPORT just click the highlighted text or on the image in this blog post and you will receive it via email. The Home Value Report is not an appraisal, but it gives you live market conditions and much more so that you remain informed and knowledgeable about your neighborhood home sales.

I’m here to help. I’ve been through the contract negotiation process countless times. We can help you cut to the chase and come up with a mutually acceptable contract.

 

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